Introducing Peanuts

Starting peanuts during infancy can help prevent peanut allergy, but how to you keep it safe?

For years I’ve been recommending peanut products to infants who are low risk for peanut allergy due to growing evidence that it’s beneficial.

What do studies show?

bamba, peanut
Bamba’s a popular snack in many areas of the world.

Studies have highlighted the benefit of early introduction of peanut product decreasing peanut allergy risk, so more parents are wanting to know exactly how to give a baby peanut products without increasing the choking risk.

The study was done using a product similar to Cheetos, made with peanut butter instead of cheese. Bamba is a snack food that has been sold in Israel for many years is now available in the US.

How can you safely give peanuts?

Parents can of course give a product like this, but what else can you do on a regular basis once your baby’s doctor clears him for peanuts?

Be careful of choking risks!

It’s important that your baby doesn’t get too much peanut butter or a chunk of nut itself because these are choking risks, so a nice thick slab of peanut butter just won’t work.

peanut allergy, feeding infantsSome ideas for introducing peanut products:
  • Look for peanut butter that doesn’t have added sugar – babies don’t need the sugar! I like the peanut powders that are available now, but I don’t think you need to spend the extra cash on the ones made just for babies.
  • Most kids love Cheerios (or other brand oat circle cereal). They do make a peanut butter flavor, made with real peanut butter. Again, look at labels to avoid cereals with high sugar content.
  • Add peanut butter powder or peanut butter to oatmeal – check the texture to be sure it isn’t too thick for your baby, add water, breast milk, or formula to thin it as needed.
  • Mix peanut butter  or peanut butter powder into applesauce (or other pureed fruits).
  • Add peanut butter or peanut butter powder to yogurt.
  • Make a peanut butter smoothie. There are many recipes online, but be sure yours doesn’t have honey if baby is under 12 months! If the recipe calls for milk, use your breast milk or formula for infants. Find one that is made with real foods, such as banana + milk + peanut butter. Babies don’t need chocolate or added sugars. If your baby doesn’t like it cold, use water instead of ice and don’t use frozen fruits.
  • Offer an occasional treat with peanut butter cookies. I like this recipe because it doesn’t have added sugar. You can leave out the raisins if your baby would choke on that texture.
  • Another occasional treat would be peanut butter muffins. Look for one without too much sugar and no honey. I couldn’t find one without any added sugar — if you do, please share below!
  • Put a thin layer of peanut butter on bread, cracker, or even your finger. You can add a little water to the peanut butter to thin it out if needed.
  • Chinese chicken with peanut sauce and other foods made with peanut butter sauces can be a treat for babies who can eat solid foods. The whole family can enjoy these meals!

Once you start peanut products, give the equivalent of 1 teaspoon peanut butter three times a week to help prevent peanut allergy!

Share your favorite recipes that can be adapted for babies and toddlers below.

related blog:

Peanut Allergy Prevention

Author: DrStuppy

I am a pediatrician and mother of two teens. I have a passion for sharing health related information.

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