Affording Medications

Another family called this week to ask if I could change their daughter’s asthma prescription to something cheaper. After looking into their insurance plan’s formulary, there really wasn’t anything cheaper. Every inhaled corticosteroid (which is the first-line medicine recommended to prevent asthma attacks) was expensive – even the generics. This family has to either find a less expensive way to purchase the prescription, choose to leave their child undermedicated, or pay over $300 per month for an asthma preventative medicine. Of course if they don’t give this medicine they risk ending up in the ER in the middle of the night. ER’s are expensive and if it’s a needed trip, it means their child is suffering.

Insurance companies make it hard.

On one hand insurance companies want patients to take the medicine appropriately to decrease long term costs of disease management. They even remind doctors to consider certain medicines if a patient has certain diagnoses and prescriptions haven’t been filled or if follow up appointments haven’t occurred.

On the other hand, they’re pricing many medicines out of reach for many families.

Transparency is a goal for healthcare, but it isn’t there, as Dr. Melissa Welby explains.

What can you do?

Check your formulary

When shopping for new insurance look at the formulary if anyone in your family is on a chronic medication. You will have to talk to an insurance company representative since formularies aren’t publicly displayed anywhere and they’re specific to your plan. This isn’t foolproof because formularies change on a regular basis, but at least learn what they currently have and what your costs would be.

Before doctor visits where you know you’ll be getting refills, check your formulary to see if it has any changes. You can usually log into your insurance company’s website to see your plan’s information.

See if you qualify for Patient Assistance Programs.

These are programs run by drug companies and other organizations that give free medicine to people who can’t afford to pay for them.

You can learn more about these on NeedyMeds, Partnership for Prescription Assistance and RxAssist.

You can also do an online search for “patient assistance program” along with the medicine name.

Shop around.

Look at GoodRx and WeRx to search local pharmacy cash pricing with their coupons. This doesn’t give the cost that your insurance will allow, but you can see how much it would cost with cash and compare to insurance cost. Sometimes it’s cheaper to not use insurance but see if the coupon will work with your insurance and compare costs.

Look at your insurance plan to see which pharmacy they prefer. I’ve had issues with this myself and I’m not sure if this is always helpful.

Get a Drug Discount Card or Coupon.

These can be used by anyone regardless of income or insurance plan. See MoneyCrashers for a nice summary on how discount cards work and when to use them.

You often can’t use insurance when you use the discount card, so you have to look at your deductible and calculate if it’s better to pay more until you meet your deductible and then get things inexpensively/free or if saving the money but not contributing to your deductible is better.

These cards can be used to help buy over the counter medicines (with a prescription) as well as prescription medicines. I think you can even get cards for your pet prescriptions.

To find drug discount cards, look at NeedyMeds, RxAssist, GoodRx, WeRx or the drug company’s website. I find it easiest to search the drug name and coupon together when looking for discounts.

I have a love-hate relationship with discount cards.

If people can’t otherwise afford a prescription (name brand or generic) then a coupon might help them purchase a needed medicine, but we all pay in the end.

Coupons are offered by manufacturers because they increase the sales of brand-name drugs by 60% or more by reducing generic sales. These programs increase drug spending by $30 million to $120 million per drug (and this study is several years old- coupons are increasingly being used so this might underestimate current spending).

Coupons can help people afford medicines, at least temporarily, but they increase insurance costs overall. If you use your insurance plan with the coupon, your insurance company pays more than they would if you purchased a generic, and they pass that cost on to consumers.

The money you spend doesn’t apply to your deductible if you don’t use insurance. Then insurance companies get off without having to pay for your medicines despite the fact that you pay them monthly to help cover your healthcare. I guess the good news is that if you don’t use insurance it doesn’t increase next year’s premium. But they might see you as “high risk” if you don’t fill recommended prescriptions, so that still might affect costs in the end.

Talk to your doctor.

Of course, it all starts with the prescription itself.

When your doctor is writing the prescription, openly discuss cost concerns. Ask about brand vs generic substitutions in the same class of medications that might be available.

We cannot know your specific formulary, but we can try to help you find the cheapest option. Electronic Health Records sometimes link to insurance formulary information to give an idea of which tier a medication is on. I find this works some of the time. Sometimes it isn’t accurate. People still get to the pharmacy and suffer from sticker shock when they’re told the cost. This is why I think it’s so very helpful if you find your formulary before even going to your appointment. It can save a lot of back and forth at the pharmacy if we have the costs at the appointment.

If you get to the pharmacy and cannot afford the medicine, be sure to let your doctor know! We want to help but we can’t if we don’t know the issues.

Affording medications can be difficult, but there are things to do that can help.
Affording medications can be difficult, but there are things to do that can help.