Measles: All about the measles vaccines

Two measles vaccines are part of the standard vaccine schedule in the US. Do you know when outbreaks change the recommendations?

In my last post I discussed why we should worry about measles. Today I’ll talk about the measles vaccines available to prevent the disease.

What measles vaccines are available?

There are two types of measles vaccines in the United States: MMR and MMRV.

There is no longer a separate measles vaccine available in the US.

MMR

The MMR includes protection against measles, mumps, and rubella. This vaccine can be used in infants 6 months and older and is the only vaccine approved over 13 years of age for those who need to catch up on vaccines.

The CDC recommends that MMR and varicella vaccines be given as separate injections for the first dose in children 12-47 months of age.

MMRV

In addition to measles, mumps, and rubella, the MMRV has protection against varicella (chicken pox). The MMRV can be used from 12 months through 12 years of age (until the 13th birthday).

Using the MMRV vaccine has the benefit of one fewer injection, but there are some downsides.

  • It cannot be used as an early dose of measles protection prior to 12 months of age.
  • The MMRV should not be used in those 13 years and older.
  • The MMRV has a higher risk of fever within 42 days after vaccination compared to the MMR and Varicella vaccines being given in separate injections, even when they’re given on the same date in children 12-24 months of age. There is less data on children 24-47 months of age, but it is likely that they also have this increased risk.
  • The MMRV has a higher risk of febrile seizures from 5-12 days after vaccination compared to the MMR + Varicella being given in separate injections, even if given on the same date.

What is the typical age of vaccination?

One of the measles vaccines is recommended routinely at 12-15 months and then again at 4-6 years.

Either the MMR or the MMRV can be used at these standard times.

If the MMR is used, a separate varicella vaccine can be used at the same time or at a different time.

Can the 2nd dose be given early?

Yes. An early 2nd dose does count as the second dose as long as it is separated by at least 28 days from other live virus vaccines.

Early second doses do count toward the required two doses after the first birthday. There is no minimum age for the second dose, as long as both doses are after the 1st birthday and a month apart.

What does the booster dose do?

Contrary to common belief, the MMR/MMRV second dose is not a booster to increase the immunity of the first dose.

About 93% of people respond to their first measles vaccine and are protected against the measles. They are protected and wouldn’t need a booster, but we can’t easily tell if any individual person is immune after the first dose. It is also possible that a person is immune to some of the MMR/MMRV components but not to all of the components, so another dose is needed for protection to be more reliable.

The second vaccine helps more people convert to being immune. After the second dose, 97% of people are immune to measles.

There are some people (3%) who are not immune despite two doses, which is why we sometimes hear of a vaccinated person still getting the disease.

Herd immunity is one reason why it is important for everyone in a community who is eligible to get the vaccine to be immunized. By immunizing the community, we can protect those in the community who are not able to be vaccinated due to young age or medical condition and those who are vaccine non-responders.

High risk situations: outbreaks and travel

It is recommended to receive an MMR (or MMRV if age indicated) if there is a local outbreak and the health department recommends an early vaccine or if an infant 6-12 months of age will be traveling to an area of increased risk.

Infants and children in high risk areas can get the second dose as early as 4 weeks after the first.

Either of the measles vaccines can be used as long as they are indicated for the age of the person being vaccinated.

More about early doses

MMR can be given to infants at least 6 months of age if they are considered high risk due to travel or outbreaks.

It is not recommended for all babies to get an early vaccine at this point.

Local health departments help to advise whether or not local conditions warrant early vaccination.

International travelers should be vaccinated against measles after 6 months of age due to the higher risk of exposure during travel.

Why not give to babies under 6 months?

Under 6 months of age an infant is considered protected from his or her mother’s antibodies. These antibodies leave the baby between 6 and 12 months after birth.

The antibodies prevent the vaccine from properly working, which is why we generally start the vaccine after the first birthday, when the antibodies have likely gone away.

Does an early dose count?

Any measles vaccine dose given before the first birthday does not count toward the two doses required after 12 months of age, but might help protect against exposure if the immunity from the mother is waning.

As mentioned above, an early 2nd dose does count as long as the first dose is after the 1st birthday and the second dose is at least 28 days later.

Is it safe to give the MMR before 12 months?

It is safe for a child to get extra doses of the vaccine if needed for increased risk of exposure between 6 and 12 months.

As discussed above, it is not because of safety that it is not routinely given earlier. It may not be effective at this age if the baby still has maternal immunity.

What’s the deal with live virus vaccines?

All live virus vaccines must be given either on the same date or a month apart. If they are given too close together on different dates they are less effective and the second one given does not count.

Other types of vaccines do not have this restriction, only live virus vaccines.

Examples of live virus vaccines include:

  • MMR
  • MMRV
  • Varicella
  • FluMist (only the nasal influenza vaccine, not the injectable flu vaccine)
  • Oral typhoid (not on the routine vaccine schedule, but recommended for international travel)
  • BCG (a vaccine against tuberculosis that is used in some countries, but not the US)
  • Oral polio (a vaccine no longer used in the US, but still in use in other countries)
  • Yellow fever (not on the routine vaccine schedule, but required prior to visiting some countries)
  • Zoster (a vaccine for older adults, not children)

For example…

If your child has FluMist (the nasal flu vaccine) on October 1st, if he or she gets the MMR or MMRV on October 15th, the MMR/MMRV won’t count.

This is becoming more difficult to track as pharmacies, work places, and other clinics offer vaccines. I can think of one instance where a parent had a child get a nasal flu vaccine a couple of weeks before the other parent brought the child in for kindergarten shots. The 2nd parent was not aware of the flu vaccine, so the live virus vaccines given at the routine well visit had to be repeated a month later. The child was not happy!

Always get documentation of the vaccines your child gets and be sure if it’s not done at your child’s primary care office that they get a copy! If you’re transferring to a new physician, request a transfer of records in writing before your first visit to your new medical home so they have what they need to best care for your family!

Tuberculosis testing with PPD

Although this is not a live virus vaccine, tuberculosis testing can also be affected by live virus vaccines.

A false negative skin test can occur if any live vaccine is given during the month BEFORE the TB skin test is done.

If MMR vaccine is given, you should wait at least 4 weeks before doing the TB skin test unless it is given on the same date.

All vaccines, live or inactivated, can be given on the same day or at any time AFTER a TB skin test is done.

What if someone who hasn’t been vaccinated is exposed to measles?

Unvaccinated people who are exposed to measles can be given post-exposure prophylaxis unless they have a vaccine contraindication.

If the MMR vaccine is given within 72 hours of initial measles exposure it may provide some protection or lead to a less severe infection.

Immunoglobulin (IG) can be given within 6 days of exposure to provide some protection.

If you think you’ve been exposed, contact your physician and/or the local health department.

Who shouldn’t be vaccinated?

The long list of medical contraindications to vaccines that some promote is not valid. There are very few contraindications to getting the MMR vaccine. These include:

  • Age less than 6 months of age
  • Anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component or neomycin
  • Those with a known severe immunodeficiency (chemotherapy, congenital immunodeficiency, long-term immunosuppressive therapy, and some with human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection)
  • Pregnant women

Some conditions have precautions, but not true contraindications, to the MMR vaccine. The risks and benefits of vaccination should be discussed if a person has the following:

  • Moderate or severe acute illness
  • Tuberculosis testing (see separate section above)
  • Antibody-containing blood products within the previous 11 months
  • Those who have received a live virus vaccine in the previous 4 weeks
  • Seizure history

What about adults?

People born before 1957 are presumed to be immune to measles because they lived through several measles epidemics before the vaccine became available.

It is not considered necessary to check titers for these adults unless they are in a high risk group, such as healthcare providers. If their titers do not show immunity, they should be vaccinated according to current recommendations.

Adults born after 1957 should have documentation of two measles vaccines or the disease. Before 1980 it was only recommended to have one vaccine, so some adults may require another dose.

If documentation is not available, titers can be done to see if you’re immune or need a vaccine. Some may choose to simply get an MMR. Talk to your doctor.

Checking titers

Titers can show if people are at risk, but are not recommended routinely. Because of the overall high level of protection (97%), the cost-benefit ratio of testing titers routinely is not in favor of testing.

Certain persons, such as healthcare providers, may have to show immunity or get additional vaccine doses.

What are the vaccine recommendations for measles during an outbreak? How do they differ from the routine schedule? @pediatricskc

In summary

Two doses of one of the measles vaccines available is recommended for everyone after their first birthday. A dose can be given between 6 and 12 months if there is high risk but it does not count toward those two.

The MMR vaccine can be used in any person over 6 months of age if they are needing a measles vaccine, as long as they have not received another live virus vaccine in the previous 28 days.

The MMRV vaccine can be used between 12 months and 13 years of age. There is a higher risk of fever and febrile seizures with this vaccine compared to the MMR + Varicella vaccines given separately (even on the same date).

The first measles vaccine provides protection 93% of the time. The second dose increases the protection to 97% of people.

It is very important that where you are getting your vaccines has access to previous vaccines given, especially if you are getting any live virus vaccines. Keep a copy of all your family member’s vaccines available at all times.

If you are changing primary care physicians for any reason, have your records transferred prior to your first visit. This must be done in writing, but your doctor must provide these. The cost of these records will be determined by the hospital or clinic and state laws.

Always keep records of your family’s vaccine records easily available. You will need these for school entry, many camps, some volunteer or work positions, and more.

Getting one of the measles vaccines is not the only type of vaccine to get. We’re seeing outbreaks of measles currently, but any of the vaccine preventable diseases can make a come back if given the opportunity.

Measles: What’s all the fuss about?

Why is everyone so worked up about the measles showing up all around the country? Is it really a big deal?

Measles is a big deal. If you understand that, you can stop reading right now. If you’re not sure why it’s so important that we vaccinate against this disease, read on. If you’re worried about the vaccine and haven’t protected your children with it, you need to learn about the disease.

Measles is highly contagious.

But it’s also preventable.

If all eligible persons are vaccinated, we can protect those who can’t be vaccinated due to young age or medical condition. This herd immunity is very important to our communities. Sadly, our herd is not protective at this point. Too many are not vaccinating due to unwarranted fears. This leaves too many vulnerable to disease, which allows infection to spread rapidly.

There are a very limited number of conditions that are true medical exemptions, but if herd immunity is high enough we can keep measles from spreading. Using false exemptions drops that herd immunity rate, leading to outbreaks like we’re seeing now.

We’ve been getting a lot of questions about the vaccine and the risks of the disease, so here’s a quick run down of the risks of a measles infection. I’ll cover the vaccines in the next post.

Why worry?

Measles is highly contagious and can be deadly.

Symptoms commonly include fever, rash, diarrhea, pneumonia, and ear infections.

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare form of chronic progressive brain inflammation caused by measles virus. It can show up many years after someone is presumed to be healed from the disease, much like shingles can affect a person years after chicken pox disease.

For every 1,000 reported measles cases in the US, approximately 1 case of encephalitis (brain inflammation) and 2-3 deaths is found. The risk for death is greater for infants, young children, and adults than for older children and adolescents.

How contagious is measles?

Measles can be spread through the air of a room 2 hours after an infected person leaves. The rash doesn’t usually appear until approximately 14 days after exposure, 2 to 4 days after the fever begins.

A person is contagious 4 days before the rash starts, so can unknowingly spread the infection for days. They remain contagious for another 4 days after the rash starts.

Over 90% of susceptible people who are exposed will get sick.

Are you willing to put your kids at risk by delaying the vaccine knowing the risks of natural infection?

Why is everyone so worked up about the measles showing up all around the country? Is it really a big deal? @pediatricskc

What vaccines are available?

There are two types of measles vaccines in the United States: MMR and MMRV.

There is no longer a separate measles vaccine.

We’ll go into these options next time. Stay tuned!

Update: Here’s Measles: All about the measles vaccines

Plan for Vacation – especially if you’re going outside the US

A little planning and preparation can help everyone in your group stay healthy while traveling. Some preventative treatments take up to 6 months to complete, so talk to your doctor early!

When families are able to travel, it can be a wonderful time of exploration and bonding. Don’t let illness get in the way. Many locations have diseases that you don’t typically see in your home town. Take a little bit of time to learn what you need to do to prepare for your vacation. Insurance doesn’t usually cover travel medicine, so be sure to consider these extra costs when planning a trip.

Keep track of everything

It is a great idea to take pictures of everyone each morning in case someone gets separated from the group. Not only will you have a current picture for authorities to see what they look like, but you will also know what they were wearing at the time they were lost.

Take pictures of your passport, vaccine record, medicines, and other important items to use if the originals are lost. Store the images so you have access to them from any computer in addition to your phone in case your phone is lost.

Have everyone, including young children, carry a form of identification that includes emergency contact information.

Create a medical history form that includes the following information for every member of your travel group. Save a copy so you can easily find it on any computer in case of emergency.

  • your name, address, and phone number
  • emergency contact name(s) and phone number(s)
  • immunization record
  • your doctor’s name, address, and office and emergency phone numbers
  • the name, address, and phone number of your health insurance carrier, including your policy number
  • a list of any known health problems or recent illnesses
  • a copy of current medications and supplements you are taking and pharmacy name and phone number
  • a list of allergies to medications, food, insects, and animals
  • a prescription for glasses or contact lenses

Prepare everyone for local specs

Learn what the local healthcare options are if someone in your travel group gets sick or injured. For several tips, see this travel information from the CDC.

Find out how you can use your phone overseas. Be sure to bring a charger that will work with local electrical outlets.

If you’re traveling with young children, plan ahead for where they’ll sleep. Infants will need a safe place of their own with a firm surface. Everyone will need time to adjust to new time zones.

Vehicle safety risks vary around the world. Know local travel options and risks. Only use authorized forms of public transportation. For general information, see this International Road Safety page. Learn local laws prior to traveling.

If you’re going to be somewhere above 8000 feet above sea level, prepare for the change in altitude with these tips.

Be sure to talk with your teens about drug and alcohol safety prior to travel. Many countries have laws that vary significantly from the United States, and some teens will be tempted to take advantage of the legal nature of a drug or alcohol.

Remind everyone to stay in groups and to not venture out alone.

Dress appropriately for the area. Some clothing common in the United States is inappropriate in other parts of the world. Americans are also at risk of getting robbed, so do not wear things that will make others presume you are a good target.

Wear sunscreen! It doesn’t matter if you’re on the beach or on the slopes, you need to wear sunscreen every time you’re outside. Don’t ruin a vacation with a sunburn. For sunscreen tips, see Sun and Water Safety.

For more safety tips, see this helpful brochure.

Prevent bug bites

When you travel be sure to protect against bug bites! #travel #prevention #vacation #questforhealthkc

Mosquitos, ticks and other bugs not only cause itchy rashes but they can carry diseases. Using insect repellant properly can help to prevent getting bit.

Use insect repellent with at least 20% DEET to protect against mosquito and tick bites. Follow package directions and reapply as directed. Do not use combination bug sprays with sunscreen. They should be applied separately.

Wear long sleeves and pants. Consider treating your clothes with permethrin and tucking your pants into your socks. Sleep in areas that are screened against bugs.

Vaccines

Extra vaccines may be needed when you travel, especially in infants who are too young to get a measles vaccine on our usual schedule and adults who have not gotten vaccines that are now on the regular schedule.

Before you travel you can look at destination-specific advice on the CDC’s Destination page.

MMR

The news routinely reports outbreaks of measles these days. Many of the US outbreaks are related to an unvaccinated person returning from abroad. The MMR protects against measles, mumps, and rubella.

While our standard vaccine schedule does not recommend the MMR until 12 months of age, the vaccine can be used in infants as young as 6 months. It is considered safe to use in infants, but we don’t know when their immunity from their mother goes down. If the maternal immunity is still active the vaccine won’t work. This immunity typically falls between 6 and 12 months. After 12 months the vaccine is more likely to be effective, so when the risk is lower, it is recommended to wait until that age for the vaccine.

Between 6 and 12 months of age the MMR is recommended for infants considered high risk for being exposed to measles. This is because if their immunity has fallen, we don’t want them to be unprotected. International travel is considered to be high risk. If your baby’s maternal immunity is still high, the vaccine won’t provide protection, but he or she is still protected until that maternal immunity falls.

Because we don’t trust that the vaccine is effective before a year of age, babies who get an early MMR will still need two after their first birthday.

Talk to your baby’s pediatrician about getting the MMR if your child is over 6 months of age. Ideally it will be given at least 2 weeks prior to travel to give the body time to develop immunity.

Hepatitis

Both hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are now on the routine schedule for children in the US, but many adults did not get these vaccines as children. These vaccines are recommended for travel to many locations. Verify if your family has had both hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines before you travel.

It is recommended that infants start hepatitis B vaccines at birth. The series is completed at 6-9 months of age. There are catch up schedules for those who haven’t completed the series on time.

Children do not get the hepatitis A vaccine until 12 months of age. If they have not yet started the series and they are over a year, they can start at any time. The booster is given 6-12 months later.

It takes at least 6 months to complete each of these series, so plan early!

Typhoid

Typhoid is not a vaccine routinely given in the US but it is recommended for travel to many parts of the world. There are two main types of typhoid vaccine, injectable and oral.

Children 2 years and older can get an injectable typhoid vaccine, ideally at least 2 weeks prior to travel. It is only one dose and lasts 2 years.

The oral vaccine is only for people 5 years and older. It is given in 4 doses over a week’s time and should be completed at least a week prior to travel. It must be given on an empty stomach (1 hour before eating and 2 hours after eating). Antibiotic treatment can make this vaccine ineffective, so discuss any current medicine you are taking with your doctor. The oral vaccine lasts 5 years.

Neither vaccine is 100 % effective so even immunized people must be careful what they eat and drink in areas of risk.

Meningitis

Meningococcal disease can refer to any illness that is caused by the type of bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Within this family, there are several serotypes, such as A, B, C, W, X, and Y. This bacteria causes serious illness and often death, even in the United States.

In the US there is a vaccine against meningitis types A, C, W, and Y recommended at 11 and 16 years of age but it can be given as young as 9 months of age. MenACWY-CRM is approved for children 2 months and older.

There is a vaccine for meningitis B prevention recommended for high risks groups in the US but is not specifically recommended for travel.

Meningitis vaccines should be given at least 7-10 days prior to potential exposure.

Travelers to the meningitis belt in Africa or the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia are considered high risk and should be vaccinated. Serogroup A predominates in the meningitis belt, although serogroups C, X, and W are also found. There is no vaccine against meningitis X, but if one gets the standard one that protects against ACWY, they will be protected against the majority of exposures. Boosters for people traveling to these areas are recommended every 5 years.

Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is a mosquito-borne infection that is found in sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America. There is no treatment for the illness, but there is a vaccine to help prevent infection. Some areas of the world require vaccination against yellow fever prior to admittance. Yellow fever vaccine is recommended for people over 9 months who are traveling to or living in areas with risk for YFV transmission in South America and Africa.

Most physician offices do not offer this vaccine. A special license is required to be able to provide it. Check with your local health department or a travel clinic in your area. This vaccine should be given at least 10 days prior to travel.

Influenza

Remember that influenza hits various parts of the world at different times of the year. The southern hemisphere tends to finish their flu season just as ours is starting. Check to see when it’s flu season and vaccinate as needed.

Medications for your trip

Aside from bringing your routine prescription medications and over the counter medicines in their original prescription container, there are some medications that are recommended for traveling to various parts of the world.

Malaria

Malaria transmission occurs in large areas of Africa, Latin America, parts of the Caribbean, Asia (including South Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East), Eastern Europe, and the South Pacific. Depending on the level of risk (location, time of year, availability of air conditioning, etc) no specific interventions, mosquito avoidance measures only, or mosquito avoidance measures plus prescription medication for prophylaxis might be recommended.

Prevention medications might be recommended, depending on when and where you will be traveling. The medicines must begin before travel starts, continue during the duration of the travel, and continue once you return home. There is a lot of resistance to various drugs, so area resistance patterns will need to be evaluated before choosing a medication. Review the area-specific travel recommendations with your doctor.

Anti-diarrhea medicines

I am commonly asked to prescribe antibiotics to prevent traveler’s diarrhea. This is discouraged due to growing bacterial resistance to antibiotics. It is best to prevent by avoiding local water, choosing foods wisely, using proper handwashing techniques, and considering bismuth subsalicylate or probiotic use.

Traveler’s diarrhea is often from bacteria, but it can also be from a viral source. Maintaining hydration with clean water with electrolytes is the most important treatment. Many cases of traveler’s diarrhea do not require antibiotics. See details of treatment recommendations in the Yellow Book.

After you return…

If you’ve been in an area of the world that has increased risk for tuberculosis (TB) or if you have suspected exposure to TB, testing for exposure is recommended.

Tuberculosis occurs worldwide, but travelers who go to most countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Russia are at greatest risk.

Travelers should avoid exposure to TB in crowded and enclosed environments. We should all avoid eating or drinking unpasteurized dairy products.

The vaccine against TB (bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine) is given at birth in most developing countries but has variable effectiveness and is not routinely recommended for use in the United States. Those who receive BCG vaccination must still follow all recommended TB infection control precautions and participate in post-travel testing for TB exposure.

It is recommended to test for exposure in healthy appearing people after travel. It is possible to have a positive test but no symptoms. This is called latent disease. One can remain in this stage for decades without any symptoms. If TB remains untreated in the body, it may activate at any time. Typically this happens when the body’s immune system is compromised, as with old age or another illness. Appropriately treating the TB before it causes active disease is beneficial for the long term.

Related posts

Traveling with kids

Traveling around the world

Motion sickness

7 Ways to keep kids from wandering and getting lost

Top 10 Quest for Health KC posts of 2018

Have you read all of the most popular 2018 posts from Quest for Health KC?

At the end of the year I like to take a look at which posts were popular to help identify what I should write about in the next year. It also gives me the opportunity to share with readers all the best posts they might have missed along the way.

10. Help! I’m sick and I have a baby at home!

Parenting is a tough job, even when you’re not sick. When you have an infant and you’re sick, not only do you have extra sleep needs, but you have to try to keep your baby healthy despite being around your germs. What can you do when you’re sick with a baby at home?

9. Top 10 reasons a child or teen is tired.

We all know the jokes about that teens sleep past noon, but the truth is they need to catch up on sleep deprivation. Learn the top 10 reasons a child or teen is tired.

8. Summer Penile Syndrome

During the summer months one of the most uncomfortable reasons I see boys is that their penis and/or scrotum is swollen significantly. Learn what Summer Penile Syndrome is and what to do about it.

7. Dark Under Eye Circles

When kids have circles under their eyes, parents worry that something’s wrong. Sometimes there’s a treatable reason, sometimes not. Learn all the most common causes of under eye circles and what to do about them.

6. The flu shot doesn’t work

I’m pro-vaccine, so this title might surprise you. I hear the argument that the flu shot doesn’t work so often that it deserves to be addressed.

5. Flu Season Fears: What should you do?

Every flu season as we start to hear reports of kids dying from influenza the fear surfaces. This was written during one of the worst outbreaks in recent history. Be protected against each flu’s season fear with a flu vaccine and healthy habits!

4. Antibiotic Allergy or Just a Rash?

We see rashes all the time when kids are on antibiotics, but thankfully most do not mean a child is allergic. Learn when to suspect antibiotic allergy versus just a rash.

3. Lip Licker’s Dermatitis

When saliva gets on our skin, it breaks it down. Licking the lips leads to increased cracking and bleeding. Some kids have a wide ring of dry skin around their mouth from lip licker’s dermatitis. Learn what you can do to help them heal their smile.

2. What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed?

There are many reasons that people fall behind on their vaccines. Some are intentional, some due to circumstance. Regardless of the cause, what happens if a vaccine booster is delayed?

1. Bumps, ridges, and soft spots on a baby’s head. When should you worry?

I wrote this because I hear concern about bumps, ridges, and soft spots on baby’s (and older kid’s) heads quite often. Learn when you should worry and when it’s okay.

What was your favorite?

I’m surprised at the popularity of a few of these and sad that some of my personal favorites didn’t make the list.

I wish more people would read what fever is so they worry less about a number. Learning the evolution of illness might also help parents understand why exam findings are different on different days. I hear far too often that an ear infection was missed, but it’s more likely that they developed since the first exam.

I’ve also written a little on insurance and the business of medicine, but it doesn’t surprise me that those are not as popular. Sadly, we all need to understand the intricacies of billing and insurance as well as how the business of medicine works. As more and more private practice physicians sell out to large corporations, we’ll all feel the negative impacts.

Flu Vaccine Season 2018-2019

What’s the new with the flu vaccine season 2018-2019? Who needs the vaccine? Should you get the shot or nosespray? Which one is preferred by experts?

Every year the flu vaccine season throws us something new and challenging. The buzz this year is pediatricians questioning what to recommend with the new version of FluMist.  So what’s new with the flu vaccine season 2018-2019?

If you tried to get a FluMist vaccine for the past couple of years, you know that it wasn’t available. It did not seem to be effective, so it was removed from use. It has been reconfigured to improve the efficacy. The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is allowing it to be re-released for the 2018-2019 season.

There are many versions of the flu shot. Some contain 3 strains of flu protection, others have 4 strains. Use of each is dependent on age and other factors. There is only one version of nasal spray flu vaccine, the FluMist.

Flu Vaccine Season 2018- 2019 ACIP Recommendations:

    • Everyone over 6 months of age who does not have a contraindication to vaccination should get a flu vaccine.
    • No preference is given for one vaccine product over another, as long as it is age appropriate and there are no contraindications. (See Controversy for details on this.)
    • Children under 10 years of age who have never had a flu vaccine should get two doses this year.
    • If vaccine supply is limited, high risk people should get priority. This includes:
    •      children 6-59 months
    •      adults over 50 years
    •      those with chronic diseases
    •      immunocompromised persons
    •      pregnant women
    •      American Indians and Alaska Natives
    •      morbidly obese people
  •      residents of long term care facilities

For the full report of recommendations, see MMWR: Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices—United States, 2018–19 Influenza Season.

The big questions that may be on your mind:

1. When’s the best time to get a flu vaccine?

The CDC recommends starting to vaccinate as soon as it’s available (usually August or September) and to have the vaccine given by Halloween.

It’s not hard to see the logistical problems of vaccinating essentially everyone in the two months of September and October.

Some of the problems getting masses vaccinated:
  • Getting the vaccine itself. Recently flu shots have started to be delivered around the country. They seemed to show up first at big chain pharmacies before doctor’s offices. There aren’t any shortages this year so far, but not everyone can get all their vaccine orders at once.
  • The FluMist hasn’t been approved for shipping yet, so no one has that at this time. If you’re hoping to get it, you’ll have to wait. No approval date has been announced as far as I know.
  • I’ve heard that some Vaccine For Children (VFC) programs haven’t even opened up their ordering for the year. (Most flu vaccines are ordered in January or February for the next vaccine season, but VFC programs are state run and vary in rules.) If your child will require a VFC vaccine, you will likely have to wait until your clinic has them in stock, even if they have other flu vaccines.
  • Many years there are shortages. Those are hard to anticipate, but are another reason not to turn down a vaccine if it’s offered.
  • Having extra personnel skilled in giving flu vaccines available is difficult when they’re needed to perform typical work. Giving vaccines takes time. There’s a lot behind the scenes that needs to be done and documented in addition to the time of getting people prepared for the shot itself. And we all have seen the kids who put up a good fight, which means the nurse can’t quickly give the shot.
  • There are always time conflicts getting to a place that offers flu shots.  Work, school and activity schedules are busy. It can be hard getting everyone in the family to a place that has the right vaccine for each person at a time that you’re not busy.
What if you aren’t vaccinated by Halloween?

There will be many who continue to be vaccinated in November and beyond. It is recommended to continue vaccinating until the vaccine supply is gone or the season ends. The flu season can possibly last through May in the Northern Hemisphere.

Will an early flu vaccine last long enough?

I’m asked this question often. I’ve been told by several parents that they want to wait to get the shot for their family until October to optimize the protection during flu season.

While this sounds good in theory, I’m afraid that some of these people may miss the opportunity to be vaccinated before the flu hits.

Although we say that it tends to hit in January in my area, it can hit at any time. I’ve already heard of one case of Flu A in another local pediatric practice.

All vaccines take time to become effective, so waiting until you hear that it’s in the community is already too late in some respects. We often have more than one peak of flu activity each year, so still get the vaccine!

The effectiveness of the flu vaccine does decrease over time, but it’s estimated to last about 6 months. Unfortunately our season can last up to 8 months, so there is no perfect time.

What if we got our flu shot later in the season last year? Is it still good?

Each year the strains in the flu vaccines are updated to reflect the anticipated strains of influenza that will circulate. It’s important to get a new flu vaccine each season. Even if your child got a flu shot in May 2018, he should get another this Fall or Winter.

Who needs a second vaccine?

It is not recommended to get a second flu shot later in the season for most people.

Children under 9 years of age getting vaccinated for the first time need their primer dose and a booster dose at least 4 weeks later. Children who have previously received ≥2 total doses of influenza vaccine at least 4 weeks apart before July 1, 2018, require only one dose for 2018–19. The 2 doses of influenza vaccine do not have to have been administered in the same season or consecutive seasons. If they had only 1 flu vaccine before July 1, 2018, they need 2 doses this season.

number of flu vaccines needed
Grohskopf LA, Sokolow LZ, Broder KR, Walter EB, Fry AM, Jernigan DB. Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices—United States, 2018–19 Influenza Season. MMWR Recomm Rep 2018;67(No. RR-3):1–20. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr6703a1

2. Will FluMist work?

Unfortunately, we won’t really know until the season is well underway. Every year we must wait to learn if the flu vaccine is effective. The effectiveness varies from year to year.

FluMist History

The FluMist was first approved in 2003. It was a welcome addition to the flu vaccine lineup because there are no needles needed. It seemed to be very effective initially. In 2014, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) even gave it preferential status because it seemed to be more effective than the flu shot version.

The very next year ACIP reversed its decision due to very poor performance of the H1N1 strain in the FluMist in the United States. (This didn’t seem to be a problem everywhere.) FluMist was removed from the market for two years as scientists tried to figure out why it didn’t work well so they could remedy the problem.

This Year’s FluMist

Testing of the new version shows that the new H1N1 LAIV strain (A/Slovenia) performed significantly better than the 2015-16 strain (A/Bolivia).  Does this mean that it will perform better this season? We really don’t know, but in February 2018, ACIP voted to bring back the newly formulated FluMist for the 2018-2019 season.

In years past it was recommended for anyone who had received the FluMist to avoid contact with immunocompromised people for 7 days. It is no longer considered to be a risk to most immunocompromised people to be around a recently vaccinated person. If the immunocompromised state is severe enough to require a protected environment, avoidance for 7 days after FluMist continues to be recommended.

Controversy

While most of the experts on the ACIP panel voted in favor to bring the FluMist back based on the study results, some members were not in agreement. They still worry that the FluMist may not perform well during the flu season.

The CDC official position states no preference between the FluMist and the shot version, as long as the vaccine is age appropriate and there are no contraindications, such as allergy or chronic disease. The shot is available for all ages over 6 months old, but the FluMist is only for 2 – 49 year olds.

The AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) stance on the FluMist is that it should only be used when the shot version is refused or unavailable. They will continually monitor the flu vaccine effectiveness patterns and may change their recommendation. If your child is worried about giving the shot, check out ways to make shots less scary.

Interestingly, Dr. Paul Offit, one of our country’s leading vaccine experts, disagrees with the AAP.

So I think the AAP was wrong, frankly, to say that FluMist should only be used as a last-resort vaccine for influenza. Rather, they should have gone along with what the ACIP said, which was that these vaccines can now be used interchangeably for persons aged 2-49 years. ~ Dr. Paul Offit

3. What about egg allergy?

For several years now egg allergy is not considered a contraindication to flu vaccines. Despite this, people still think they cannot be vaccinated due to an allergy.

Severe allergic reactions to vaccines, although rare, can occur at any time, even in without a history of previous allergic reaction. The person giving flu vaccines should be able to identify and equipped to handle any allergic reaction.

Different influenza vaccines contain different amounts of egg components, so it is important to discuss the history of egg allergy with the person who will give the flu vaccine.

Recommendations for those with egg allergy:
  • People with a history of egg allergy who have only had hives after exposure to egg should receive influenza vaccine. Any version that is age appropriate can be used.
  • People who have required epinephrine after eating egg or who have had angioedema, respiratory distress, lightheadedness, or recurrent vomiting are considered higher risk with influenza vaccination. They still may receive an age appropriate influenza vaccine, but it should be done in a health care setting, such as a medical clinic or hospital. They should not get the vaccine at a community drive, such as in a school or church setting. Vaccine administration should be supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic reactions.
  • A previous severe allergic reaction to influenza vaccine, regardless of the component suspected of being responsible for the reaction, is a contraindication to vaccinating with that vaccine in the future. This does not include the typical reactions of redness at the injection site, fever, or muscle aches.
  • No observation period is recommended specifically for egg-allergic people. If there is concern, a 15 minute observation period after any vaccine can be done. This is commonly done in the adolescent age group due to their high risk for passing out after any needle – shots or blood draws.

4. What if you’re traveling internationally?

Influenza season varies by location. In the US, we tend to think of it as a winter thing, but it can happen during our summer months elsewhere. Flu is seen in the fall and spring in addition to the winter months in Kansas.

In the Northern Hemisphere it tends to hit between October and May. The Southern Hemisphere’s season tends to be April through September.

Even the types of influenza that circulates can vary by location. These types affect the type of vaccine that is used in that location.

It’s recommended to be vaccinated against influenza at least 2 weeks before traveling to any location during their flu season. This can be difficult if there is not any flu vaccine in your area. It can also be difficult to find the correct strains of flu vaccine in your location.

Talk to your physician or a travel clinic to see what is needed and available.

5. Doesn’t the flu shot cause the flu?

No. No it doesn’t.

Flu is a very dangerous illness that results in many people requiring hospitalization. Each year previously healthy children and adults die from influenza.

The symptoms people get after flu shots often could be explained by many viruses. They are not the flu. If they really are flu symptoms, it is because the vaccine didn’t have time to take effect or it was a strain not included in the vaccine.

There is no plausible way that the injectable flu vaccine can cause the flu. There is no live virus in the injectable vaccine that can lead to flu disease. Injectable flu vaccines are made in two ways. Either the vaccine is made with flu vaccine viruses that have been ‘inactivated’ and are not infectious or with no flu vaccine viruses at all.

The most common side effects from the influenza shot are soreness, redness, tenderness or swelling where the shot was given. Low-grade fever, headache and muscle aches also may occur, but interestingly these same symptoms occur with placebo shots too.

How do we know it doesn’t cause illness?

Studies like this one in adults have compared side effects of a flu shot to side effects of a placebo with saline (salt water). The only differences in symptoms was increased soreness in the arm and redness at the injection site among people who got the flu shot. There were no differences in terms of body aches, fever, cough, runny nose or sore throat. These all can occur during the time frame that the flu vaccine is typically recommended. It’s just a coincidence if you “get sick” after getting the vaccine.

Studies in children are lacking. Ethically it is difficult to study this, since it would require not giving some children a potentially life saving vaccine if they receive the placebo.

What about the FluMist?

The FluMist is a live virus. It can cause congestion and symptoms like a very mild case of the flu.

FluMist can cause mild illness, but it prevents (or hopefully will prevent) significant flu disease symptoms.

6. What if you get the flu?

I’ll write separately about how to treat the flu and flu-like symptoms.

You can guess what it will say based on what I’ve written previously about fever being scary, how to treat coughs, and Tamiflu.

7. Why bother, since the flu shot isn’t effective.

The effectiveness of the flu vaccine is never perfect, but it’s better than nothing. For more on this, see The flu shot doesn’t work.

What's new for the flu vaccine season 2018-2019? Should we use the shot or nosespray?
This Flat Stanley spent time in our office one flu vaccine season. Given the paucity of good stock photos of people getting vaccines, I chose this one to highlight the point of few photo choices. And I think it’s fun.

Alphabet Soup of Meningitis Vaccines: A, C, W, Y, B… What does it mean?

In my previous post I discussed the many different types of meningitis and most of the vaccines used to prevent them. Meningococcal meningitis deserves its own post because there are different strains of meningococcus and different vaccines to cover those strains. We’re familiar with the recommended vaccine schedule, but one type of meningitis vaccine falls into a lesser known category, so it’s very confusing. Here I’ll discuss the two main types of meningitis vaccines that protect against meningococcal meningitis as well as the recommendations for their use.

Meningococcal meningitis can refer to any meningitis caused by the type of bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis, but there are many different types of N. meningitidis. We have vaccines to protect against types A, C, W, Y, and B.

Who gets N. meningitis?

Infants, teens, and young adults are most likely to get meningococcal meningitis. You can see from the graph that infants have the highest risk, followed by the elderly, but there is a bump in the adolescent years. Among the adolescents, 16-23 years of age is the highest risk.

Meningococcal disease incidence by age.
Source: CDC

People at increased risk

Like most infectious diseases, risk increases if there are a lot of people living in close quarters. This is why college outbreaks occur, but even teens and young adults not in college are at a higher risk.

People who have weak immune systems or a damaged or missing spleen are at higher risk.

Sub-Saharan Africa is called the meningitis belt. People who live or visit there are at risk.

Living in or visiting areas of a current or recent outbreak of course elevates the risk.

Working in a lab that handles N. meningitidis bacteria is considered high risk.

Anyone at higher risk should talk to their doctor about when they are eligible for meningitis vaccines. These recommendations differ from the standard vaccine recommendations.

Rates of meningitis are falling

Rates of meningococcal disease have been falling in the US since the 1990s, mostly due to the routine use of meningococcal vaccines. Among 11 through 19 year olds, the rate of meningococcal disease caused by serogroups C, W and Y has decreased 80% since tweens and teens were first recommended to get a meningococcal conjugate vaccine.

Interestingly, serogroup B meningococcal disease has declined even though vaccines were not available to help protect against it until the end of 2014.

It is difficult to measure the impact of these vaccines because the overall incidence of the disease is so low. It takes large numbers of vaccines over time to measure effectiveness because the disease is so rare. It’s easier to notice change when something is frequent. The less common something is, the harder it is to follow trends and measure incidence.

Vaccines to prevent meningococcal meningitis

In the United States there are two types of meningococcal vaccines, quadrivalent and serogroup B.

Quadrivalent Conjugate Vaccines (MCV4)

Menactra and Menveo are different brands of meningococcal conjugate vaccine. These protect against serogroups A, C, W, and Y. Because there are four serogroups, it is called quadrivalent, shortened MCV4 – meningococcal conjugate vaccine 4.

Between 80-90% of tweens and teens vaccinated with Menactra show immune protection one month after completing the series. This protection drops to 70-90% of adults vaccinated with Menactra.

Between 70-90% of tweens, teens, and adults vaccinated with Menveo show immune protection 1 month after completing the series of vaccine.

The immunity from the MCV4 vaccines seems to fall after about 5 years.

Side effects from the vaccines are generally mild and self resolve within a few days. These side effects include redness and pain in the area of the injection as well as fever. More serious reactions, such as an allergic response, are possible but rare.

Any vaccine (or use of a needle for a blood draw) can lead to fainting in tweens and teens. It is recommended that they sit for 15 minutes after all vaccines and blood draws. This can help to prevent a head injury if they fall when they faint.

Routine recommendations

MCV4 is usually first given when kids are 11 to 12 years of age, followed by a booster at age 16 years.

The vaccine’s protection falls over time, so two doses are necessary. For most US children, getting the vaccine at 11 years protects through the early period of increased risk and the booster at 16 years covers the late teen and young adult years.

High risk groups

Children between 2 months and 10 years who are considered high risk based on the risk categories above should be vaccinated earlier.

Adults should get the MCV4 vaccine if they have the risk factors noted above.

Serogroup B Vaccines

Bexsero and Trumenba are meningococcal vaccines that protect against serogroup B. These vaccines are commonly called Meningitis B vaccines, or MenB. These vaccines are significantly different from one another, so if the series of vaccines is started, it needs to be completed with the same brand. They are not interchangeable, as are most vaccine brands. There is no preference of one brand over another.

Bexsero is a 2 dose series. Doses should be 1 month apart. Between 60-90% of people show immune response 1 month after completing the 2 dose series.

Trumenba is a 3 dose series. It should be given at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. If the 2nd dose is delayed beyond 6 months, only 2 doses are required. Eighty percent of people show a protective immune response one month after completing the series.

Side effects to MenB vaccines are generally mild. They include soreness, redness and swelling of the injection area, fatigue, headache, muscle or joint pains, fever, nausea, and diarrhea. If these symptoms occur, they generally self resolve within a week. More serious reactions, such as an allergic reaction, are possible but rare.

Again, it is recommended that tweens and teens sit for 15 minutes after all vaccines and blood draws due to the risk of fainting.

High risk people

MenB vaccines are recommended for people at high risk between 10 and 25 years of age.

Healthy, low risk people

The tricky part is that Men B vaccine is only given permissive use for most 16-23 year olds.

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) makes recommendations for vaccine use based on all the data that is collected. Members of the Committee felt that the data available did not support the routine use of MenB vaccines, so it is not on the list of recommended vaccines.

What is permissive use?

Permissive use means it is approved for use, but it isn’t one of the standardly recommended vaccines.

This category is given because the vaccine is felt to be safe, but there is not sufficient evidence to recommend that it be given routinely.

Is it ever required for healthy people?

Some colleges require it. This is often due to a recent local outbreak so they are considered high risk.

Does insurance cover it if it’s not recommended?

Most often insurance does cover the MenB vaccine, but this is one of the concerns raised by the groups who argued that it should be routinely recommended. They argued that some insurance companies might not cover it if it is not recommended.

If you plan to get the vaccine, you should check with your insurance carrier to see if it is covered.

Why isn’t it recommended for everyone?

The meningitis A,C,W,Y vaccine is recommended for everyone at 11 and 16 years of age, so why isn’t the meningitis B vaccine recommended for all?

MenB vaccines protect against the majority of currently circulating strains of meningococcal B, but not all. The MenB vaccine also gives only a short duration of protection.

It is expensive to vaccinate, and since there is a relatively low incidence of meningitis B disease, it would take a lot of money to prevent a single case. While no price can be put on the value of human life, the overall risk remains low to individuals, even when they are not vaccinated. All of these factors led to the committee’s decision.

Dr. Vincent Iannelli discusses the risks and benefits in more detail at Understanding the Recommendations to Get a Men B Vaccine if you want more details.

Where can you get MenB if you choose to get it?

Physician offices, student health care centers, pharmacies, and county health departments might offer the MenB vaccine. Since it is not on the standard schedule, they might opt to not carry it. If you desire it, you should ask if it’s available.

My office offered the MenB vaccine last summer, but we did not have enough patients want it after discussing the current recommendations. Much of our stock went unused and had to be wasted.

We did not feel that we could push it strongly despite the fact that we were losing money on unused stock.

I know this might surprise some who believe that doctors are just pharmaceutical shills. (Shills is a term used to imply that doctors offer vaccines only to make money despite knowing about their dangers.)

My partners and I didn’t push this vaccine because we didn’t believe strongly in it. We bought it to be able to offer it to patients who desired it, but since we couldn’t honestly say we recommended getting it, we had few want it.

In the end we decided to not re-order it. We no longer offer MenB vaccine.

We strongly believe in giving the vaccines that are recommended. Recommended vaccines have been shown to not only be safe, but also effective in preventing disease. They can make a big impact on our health as individuals and as a community.

Final MenB Vaccine Thoughts

Unfortunately, the MenB vaccine has failed to show sufficient effectiveness to support the cost of vaccinating everyone.

Putting value on one person’s life is not possible, so if my patients want this vaccine, I suggest they go to the health department, a pharmacy, or student health on their college campus.

I do not think it is wrong to get the vaccine. I simply can’t say that everyone should get it.

Some students must get it due to their school’s requirement. If a school requires it, that should not be argued. The schools with MCV4 requirements often have had a recent outbreak and are considered high risk. In that case, protect yourself!

Meningitis Basics: What you need to know.

Meningitis occurs when a virus or bacteria causes inflammation of our brain or spinal cord. We use several different vaccines to prevent a few types of meningitis, but it’s all very confusing. Recent commercials have raised questions about what these vaccines are and if they’re needed.

Today we’ll go over what meningitis is and what types of germs cause it. Next time I’ll discuss some of the new meningitis vaccines in more detail.

What is meningitis?

Symptoms of MeningitisBoth viruses and bacteria can cause meningitis, but not everyone with these germs gets meningitis. Most people have less severe symptoms when they get these infections.

Not everyone gets all the symptoms listed below when they have meningitis. Some of these symptoms are common to many less serious infections, but if your child has these symptoms and appears more sick than normal, he or she should be evaluated immediately.

Symptoms of meningitis include:
  • fever
  • stiff neck
  • body aches and pains
  • sensitivity to light
  • mental status changes
  • irritability
  • confusion
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • seizures
  • rash
  • poor feeding

Viral meningitis

Viruses are the most common cause of meningitis. Thankfully viral meningitis tends to be less severe than bacterial meningitis.

Most people recover on their own from viral meningitis. As with many infections, young infants and people who have immune deficiencies are most at risk.

There are many types of viruses that can cause meningitis. It’s likely that you’ve had many of these or have been vaccinated against them.

Non-polio enterovirus

The most common virus to cause meningitis is one from the non-polio enterovirus family.

Fever, runny nose, cough, rash, and blisters in the mouth are all symptoms that kids can get from this type of virus.

Most kids are infected with this type of virus at some point. Adults are less susceptible, and can even have the virus without symptoms.

There is no routine vaccine given for non-polio virus strains.

MM(R)V

Measles, mumps and chicken pox viruses can cause meningitis.

We vaccinate against these typically at 12-15 months of age, so it is uncommon to see these diseases. The MMR and varicella vaccines can be given separately or as MMRV. (Rubella is the “R” and can lead to brain damage in a fetus, but does not cause meningitis.)

Influenza

Influenza can cause meningitis, which is one of the reasons we recommend vaccinating yearly against flu starting at 6 months of age.

Herpesviruses

Herpesviruses can cause meningitis. Despite the name, most of these are not sexually transmitted.

This family of viruses includes Epstein-Barr virus,which leads to mono most commonly. Cold sores from herpes simplex viruses are also in this group. Chicken pox (or varicella-zoster virus) is another of these blistering viruses.

Bacterial meningitis

Bacteria that lead to meningitis can quickly kill, so prompt treatment is important. If you’ve been exposed to bacterial meningitis, you may be treated as well, but remember that most people who get these bacteria do not get meningitis.

Most people who get bacterial meningitis recover, but some have lasting damage. Hearing loss, brain damage, learning disabilities, and loss of limbs can result from various types of meningitis.

Causes of bacterial meningitis vary by age group:

Newborns

Newborns can be infected during pregnancy and delivery as well as after birth. They tend to get really sick very quickly, so this is one age group we take any increased risk of infection very seriously.

Bacteria that tend to infect newborns include Group B Streptococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli.

Mothers are routinely screened for Group B Strep during the last trimester of pregnancy. They are not treated until delivery because this bacteria does not cause the mother any problems and is so common that it could recur before delivery if it’s treated earlier. This could expose the baby at the time of delivery. If a mother does not get adequately treated with antibiotics before the baby is born, the baby may have tests run to look for signs of infection or might be monitored in the hospital a bit more closely.

Once the mother’s water breaks, we time how long it has been because this opens the womb up for germs to infect the baby. If the baby isn’t born during the safe timeframe, your delivering physician or midwife might suggest antibiotics. After delivery your baby might have tests done to look for signs of infection or might be monitored more closely in the nursery.

It is very important that sick people stay away from newborns as much as possible. Everyone should wash their hands well before handling a newborn.

Babies and children

As children leave the newborn period, their risks change. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) are the bacteria that cause disease in this age group.

Thankfully we have vaccines against many of these bacteria. Infants should be vaccinated against S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae starting at 2 months of age. (Note: H. influenzae is not related at all to the influenza virus.)

Vaccines against N. meningitidis are available, but are not routinely given to infants at this time. High risk children should receive the vaccine starting at 2 months of age, but it is generally given at 11 years of age in the US.

Teens and young adults

Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the risks in this age group.

Thankfully most teens in the US have gotten the S. pneumoniae vaccine as infants so that risk is lower than in years past.

Tweens and are routinely given a vaccine against A, C, W, and Y strains of N. meningitis. A vaccine against meningitis B is recommended for high risk people and can be given to lower risk teens. This will be discussed further in my next blog.

Older adults

Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), group B Streptococcus and Listeria monocytogenes affect the elderly

Talk to your parents to be sure they’re vaccinated and follow the vaccine recommendations for yourself too. Vaccines are not just for kids!

‘NI, Leptomeningitis purulenta cerebralis. Alfred Kast’ . Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY

 

When vaccines are given too soon

Sometimes vaccines are given too soon to count toward the required vaccine schedule. This can easily happen if there are changes to the standard vaccine schedule for any reason, but what does that mean for the child? Are they in danger? Do they need extra shots? Is that even safe???

Early vaccines don’t count.

Don’t try to sneak in early before a recommended age.

It’s not appropriate in most cases to give vaccines at shorter intervals or before the recommended age.

The 12-15 month vaccines are occasionally given before the 1st birthday, which does not count in every state. State laws can dictate a grace period in which vaccines can be given earlier than the standard schedule, but not all do.

This is an issue with some children moving from a more lenient state to one with a lesser (or no) grace period.

In some states they can get their MMR a couple days before their first birthday.

Does this protect them against measles, mumps, and rubella?

~ Probably. (Nothing’s 100%.)

Does every school count it?

~No. If they move to a state that doesn’t, they need to repeat it.

International travel changes things.

It is recommended for international travelers over 6 months to get an MMR early due to worldwide measles outbreaks.

This dose does not count toward the 2 doses typically given after the 1st birthday because younger children do not make immunity as reliably, but is felt to potentially benefit those at higher risk due to travel.

Most babies are protected against measles for 6-12 months after birth.

If the MMR vaccine is given when they are already protected, the vaccine doesn’t work.

We don’t know if a 6-12 month old is safe or not, so when the risks increase, as with international travel, it is recommended to give a shot to help if needed.

But that shot might not work, so it should be repeated after the 1st birthday.

Minimal intervals are important.

Most vaccines are given as a series, and each vaccine within a series needs to be separated by a minimal interval.

Before vaccine logic was built into our electronic health record, it could be difficult to know which vaccines were recommended if people got off the standard schedule.

Not all EHRs have smart vaccine logic, so if you’re off schedule, be sure to discuss intervals before giving vaccines.

The hepatitis vaccines are more commonly given off an appropriate schedule than other vaccines. I’ll touch on each of them and why they’re problematic.

Hepatitis A vaccine interval problems.

My office routinely gives the first Hepatitis A vaccine at 12 months and the second at 18 months. The CDC schedule states:

Hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine. (minimum age: 12 months)

Routine vaccination:

  • 2 doses, separated by 6–18 months, between the 1st and 2nd birthdays. (A series begun before the 2nd birthday should be completed even if the child turns 2 before the 2nd dose is given.)

Despite warning parents to schedule the 18 month visit 6 months or more from the 1 year visit, sometimes they don’t have the correct spacing. This generally happens when they do the 1 year visit several weeks after the birthday but then try to “get back on track” and do the 18 month exam on time.

The good news is our smart EHR tracks minimal intervals and doesn’t suggest the vaccine if it’s too early.

I typically wait until the 24 month visit to do the 2nd Hepatitis A vaccine if it is too early at the 18 month visit, but I ask the family to come in just before the 2nd birthday. This allows the child gets the vaccine before 24 months of age and fit the main recommendation of getting both doses between the 1st and 2nd birthdays.

Sidenote about HEDIS

A delay to wait until the 2 year well visit follows the CDC recommendation to have the doses separated by 6-12 months.

Despite following the CDC guidelines, it fails to meet HEDIS benchmarks.

If a child gets the Hepatitis A vaccine after the 2nd birthday, the physician loses quality points.

These points help rank physicians for insurance company purposes.

As long as it doesn’t happen often, it’s not an issue.

But if schedules are off too often, a physician’s contracts with insurance companies could be at risk because they are seen as not high quality, regardless of why the vaccine is given after the 2nd birthday.

If you want to keep your favorite physician and use your insurance, please help them meet the standards of care for all metrics. This includes coming in for annual well visits and having regular follow up for chronic issues. It also means taking the recommended medications, such as preventative medicines for asthma and doing certain labs, such as lipid panels, or screenings, such as depression screenings.

Sidenote about vaccine shills

There are many groups sounding alarms about physicians getting paid huge amounts of money to vaccinate from Big Pharma. I wish this was true, but it’s not.

Don’t confuse the HEDIS measures and insurance contracts with this Big Pharma farce. First off, we pay pharmaceutical companies to buy their vaccines. They don’t pay us. Sometimes they buy a lunch for our staff so they can have our attention when they talk about their products, but there is no big money to be made from vaccine companies.

Insurance companies pay us for the vaccine and the costs associated with giving vaccines. These costs are not only for syringes and band aides. We must carry insurance for the vaccine inventory. There must be a dedicated refrigerator and freezer to safely store vaccines. We should use a refrigerator alarm system to alert us if the temperature is too warm or too cold. We pay staff to keep logs about refrigerator temperatures and inventory. All of these costs add up.

Trust me, no one gets rich off of vaccines.

Some insurance companies offer bonuses if we meet HEDIS measures, but more often I think they just pay less if we don’t meet measures.

Why do they pay more if we give vaccines?

Because the insurance company comes out ahead if we vaccinate. Vaccine preventable diseases cost them much more than vaccines. They want to encourage us to vaccinate to save them money.

Hepatitis B Interval problems.

Hepatitis B vaccine is given in 3 doses, with the second 4 weeks after the first, then the 3rd at least 8 weeks from the 2nd and 16 weeks after the 1st.

There are vaccines that just have hepatitis B protection (monovalent vaccines) that can be given starting at birth. They can be used for all three doses.

There are other vaccines that combine the hepatitis B vaccine with other vaccines (combination vaccines). The combination vaccines are given at different intervals, depending on what is in the vaccine. They cannot be given under 6 weeks of age, but it’s still recommended to give the first dose within 24 hours of birth.

Yes, it’s confusing.

From the CDC guidelines:
  • A complete series is 3 doses at 0, 1–2, and 6–18 months. (Monovalent HepB vaccine should be used for doses given before age 6 weeks.)
  • Infants who did not receive a birth dose should begin the series as soon as feasible.
  • Administration of 4 doses is permitted when a combination vaccine containing HepB is used after the birth dose.
  • Minimum age for the final (3rd or 4th) dose: 24 weeks.
  • Minimum intervals: Dose 1 to Dose 2: 4 weeks / Dose 2 to Dose 3: 8 weeks / Dose 1 to Dose 3: 16 weeks. (When 4 doses are given, substitute “Dose 4” for “Dose 3” in these calculations.)

There are even additional recommendations if the mother is a known Hepatitis B carrier or if her status is unknown.

If any of the doses are given too early, they need to be given again. This is considered safe.

Live viruses need special attention.

Live viruses must be given either at the same time or at least 28 days apart. If they are given at a shorter interval, the second vaccine is presumed to not be effective and must be repeated.

This is another great reason to not alter the standard vaccine schedule your provider uses. If your child gets off track, you run the risk of him or her needing additional vaccines.

Common live virus vaccines include MMR, Varicella, MMRV, and Flumist.

Some vaccines, like the oral typhoid vaccine, cannot be given at the same time as antibiotics.

Quiz yourself!

See if you know what vaccines your child needs.

To avoid vaccines that are given too soon:

  • Be sure that whoever is giving vaccines knows any recent vaccines and medicines your child has had recently.
  • Try to stay within the recommended vaccine schedule as much as possible to avoid needing extra doses.

Vaccine schedules for children birth – 6 years and 7-18 years:

 

 

 

Top Reasons to Follow the Recommended Vaccine Schedule

Every once in a while we see a child whose school nurse says the child’s vaccines didn’t count and need to be repeated. This can be due to many things, usually inappropriate timing of vaccines. Some electronic health records now have intelligent vaccine recommendation abilities. These smart vaccine logic systems are catching kids who had incorrect spacing before this technology. Staying on the routine vaccine schedule and keeping all records in one place can help avoid extra doses due to inappropriately spaced vaccines.

One thing to remember if your child needs extra doses: you don’t need to worry. They’re safe!

What’s in this post?

First you’ll need to understand about the different types of vaccines to know why they are scheduled like they are. Some are given in a series to boost the initial response, but others need to be repeated to cover those who weren’t protected with a first dose.

Then we’ll do a quick review of the risk of the diseases to remind us why we vaccinate in the first place.

Hopefully after learning some basics, you’ll see why the timing of vaccines is so important and why we should all follow the recommended vaccine schedule.

What’s not in this post?

If you want to know what to do if a recommended vaccine has been delayed, see What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed?

Dr. Vincent Iannelli has a list that includes some issues not discussed in this post, such as improper storage.

How vaccines work

Vaccines are made in different ways and the body responds to them in different ways.

Live attenuated vaccines

Live attenuated vaccines are made from weakened virus that teaches the body to recognize the real virus but doesn’t cause the symptoms of the virus in healthy people.

Those with weak immune systems should talk to their physician before receiving a live virus vaccine. The amount of immune compromise and specific vaccine must be taken into account on an individual basis.

It’s usually okay to be vaccinated with a live virus vaccine if you’ll be around an immunocompromised person, but again, let your physician know the risk of exposure.

Examples of live virus vaccine:
  • rotavirus
  • measles
  • mumps
  • rubella
  • varicella
  • nasal flu vaccine (NOT the injectable flu vaccine)

Many people respond sufficiently to the first dose of these, but repeat doses are given to help those who missed the response the first time.

The second dose doesn’t boost the first, but it gives a person a second chance at making immunity.

Spacing between doses:

Because of the way these vaccines work, they must follow special separation rules. More than one live virus vaccine can be given on the same day, but they cannot be given on separate days that are closer than 4 weeks apart.

If one live virus vaccine is given, you must wait a minimum of 28 days to give another. If they’re given too close together, the body doesn’t make immunity as well to the second one given. This second vaccine wouldn’t count.

As an example, if the FluMist (nasal flu vaccine) is given on January 1 and the Varicella vaccine is given January 15 of the same year, the Varicella vaccine will not count and must be repeated.

Live virus vaccines are the only vaccines that are subject to this 28 day rule. If another vaccine type is needed, it is okay to give in a shorter time frame.

For example, if a child has the MMR at his 4 year well visit, it is okay to do an injectable flu vaccine at a flu clinic later that same month. (Note: the nasal flu vaccine is a live virus vaccine, so it is NOT okay to give the FluMist within the month before or after the MMR.)

If there is less than 28 days between live virus vaccines, the one that was given second must be repeated.

I see this quite frequently in kids who move to the US from other countries. It seems quite common elsewhere for kids to get the varicella (chicken pox) vaccine about 2 weeks after the MMR. When this happens, another varicella vaccine is needed.

Live virus vaccines aren’t recommended under 1 year… usually

Many parents worry that we don’t give live virus vaccines to infants because they’re less safe, but that’s not why at all.

Maternal antibodies (fighter cells from mom that got into baby during pregnancy) can inhibit the body from being able to build its own antibodies well against a vaccine.

Maternal antibodies are good because as long as they’re in the baby’s body, they fight off germs and protect the infant! They tend to hang around for the first 6-12 months of life.

If a disease has a low incidence, it is acceptable to let the maternal antibodies do their job for the first year.

By the first birthday most maternal antibodies have left the infant, so a vaccine can be used to build the baby’s immunity.

International travel increases risks

If there is a high risk of exposure it is recommended to give the vaccine as early as 6 months in case the maternal antibodies are already too low for infant protection. Many parts of the world have high measles rates so fit into this recommendation.

If the antibody levels are still high, the vaccine won’t work, but the baby should still be protected against the disease from mom’s antibodies.

At some point the maternal antibodies go away, we just don’t know when exactly, so the baby who gets the MMR early needs another dose after his first birthday to be sure he’s making his own antibodies once mom’s go away. This dose after the birthday is the first that “counts” toward the two MMRs that are needed.

The next dose of MMR can be anytime at least 28 days after the first counted dose, but we traditionally give it between 4-6 years with the kindergarten shots.

Yes, I realize there are some measles outbreaks in the US, but the experts have not said to start giving that extra dose to babies who are staying here yet. If you’re worried, talk to your doctor.

Inactivated virus vaccines

Inactivated virus vaccines are made by killing the virus and using it to make the vaccine.

They aren’t as effective as live virus vaccines, so several doses are needed to build immunity to these.

Examples of inactivated virus vaccines:
  • inactivated polio vaccine
  • injectable flu vaccines
  • hepatitis A vaccine

Subunit, recombinant, polysaccharide, and conjugate vaccines

Subunit, recombinant, polysaccharide, and conjugate vaccines use specific pieces of a virus or bacteria to make a vaccine.

Because these vaccines use only specific antigens, they give a very strong immune response that’s specific to the infectious particle and side effects are less common.

This type of vaccine is safe for nearly everyone, including people with weak immune systems.

One limitation of these vaccines is that you may need booster shots to get ongoing protection against diseases.

Subunit, recombinant, polysaccharide, and conjugate vaccines include:
  • Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) – not related to influenza vaccine at all
  • Hepatitis B
  • HPV
  • whooping cough
  • pneumoccal disease
  • meningococcal disease

Toxoid vaccines

Toxoid vaccines prevent diseases caused by bacteria that produce toxins in the body.

The toxins are weakened into toxoids so they cannot cause illness and are used to make the vaccine.

When the immune system receives a vaccine containing a toxoid, it learns how to fight off the natural toxin.

Example of toxoid vaccine:
  • diphtheria and tetanus portions of the DTaP vaccine

Several shots are needed to build and continue immunity over time.

Passive immunization

Passive immunization is a bit different than any of the above.

Either catching a disease or getting any of the above vaccines stimulates your immune system to make memory cells to fight of that specific germ if it comes in contact with it.

Passive immunity results when a person is given someone else’s antibodies.

The protection offered by passive immunization is short-lived, usually lasting only a few weeks or months, but it helps protect right away.

Example of a passive vaccine:
  • Synagis (RSV) vaccine

Why are vaccines repeatedly given?

Vaccines interact with the T and B cells of our immune system to make memory cells.

If you want to learn more, see How Vaccines Work. It’s a really cool slide show from The College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Some vaccines need several doses to help the body develop a strong immunity against the germs. Later boosters are required to maintain that level of protection.

Other vaccines require more than one dose to insure that most people develop the protection.

Age at time of vaccine matters

The CDC Immunization schedule allows for age ranges for many vaccines to be given. Many states allow a grace period around those ages, but not all do.

Some vaccines have been shown to work best at certain ages. Our vaccine schedule reflects the best ages to give vaccines so that they are safe and effective.

If a child receives a vaccine within the grace period of their current state, it might “count.” But if that child moves to another state, the vaccine might not count per the new state’s laws.

My office only gives the routine MMR, Varicella, and Hepatitis A vaccines on or after the first birthday to help prevent a child from moving to a location that does not have a grace period. This is despite the fact that Kansas does have a 4 day grace period.

We will give the MMR earlier under certain circumstances as discussed above, but it does not count toward the two needed after the 1st birthday.

Spacing matters

Many vaccines need to be separated by a minimum timeframe, often 4 weeks, but sometimes longer. The Hepatitis A vaccine has a minimum timeframe of 6 months between doses, for example.

If the vaccine doses are not separated by a minimum time, one or more will need to be repeated.

For spacing rules, see the CDC vaccine schedule at the bottom of this post. Click on “footnotes” to see the details for each vaccine.

Why not space them out further?

Many parents have come to believe the “too many too soon” theory. They believe this despite the overwhelming evidence that vaccines are safe and effective when given according to the CDC schedule.

The risks to waiting to give vaccines are many.

Increasing vaccine preventable disease rates

Young adults of today have grown up without seeing the suffering of vaccine preventable diseases. But we’re seeing an increase in these diseases where vaccine rates have fallen.

Infants who aren’t vaccinated are at risk of diseases that can lead to death. They are among the most vulnerable and need protection.

More trips = more exposure

Not only are underimmunized children more at risk for vaccine preventable diseases, but bringing them to a clinic more frequently to do one vaccine a time increases risk. Each time they visit the clinic, they’re exposed to all the common viruses. Why risk bringing them back again and again to get more exposures?

Giving the vaccines together has been shown to be safe and effective.

More visits = more stress

There are studies that show less overall stress to the body if vaccines are given together.

Studies have shown that the first injection causes a stress response measured by elevated heart rate, blood pressure, cortisol levels, and cry. Subsequent injections given at the same time do not increase as significantly the stress when compared to returning on different days to get further injections.

The immune system can handle it

Are you worried about “too many too soon” and that vaccines will overwhelm the immune system? Stop worrying. These fears are simply unfounded.

As Paul Offit summarized in Addressing Parents’ Concerns: Do Multiple Vaccines Overwhelm or Weaken the Infant’s Immune System?:

Current studies do not support the hypothesis that multiple vaccines overwhelm, weaken, or “use up” the immune system. On the contrary, young infants have an enormous capacity to respond to multiple vaccines, as well as to the many other challenges present in the environment. By providing protection against a number of bacterial and viral pathogens, vaccines prevent the “weakening” of the immune system and consequent secondary bacterial infections occasionally caused by natural infection.

Keep your child’s vaccine record handy

I see many kids who transfer to my office but I don’t have access to their vaccine records at the time of the visit. This makes it difficult to know which (if any) vaccines are needed.

Hopefully as we use Electronic Health Records with portals and vaccine registry databases more this will become a non-issue. At this time it’s still a problem.

This is one of the many reasons I prefer for all vaccines to be given at the same clinic. If you’re changing primary care providers, be sure records are transferred before your first visit.

Flu vaccines are especially troublesome.

Flu vaccines are commonly given in many locations: your primary care provider (PCP) office, a parent’s workplace, a local pharmacy, at a school flu vaccine drive. They need to be repeated yearly, so it’s easy to forget if each of your kids has had it this year.

It’s common for one parent to not know if their child got a flu vaccine already this season. That leads to a missed opportunity or vaccines given unnecessarily.

I have seen a few kids who couldn’t get their kindergarten vaccines at their well visit because they recently had a FluMist elsewhere. That requires another trip to the office for the family.

I have seen a few kids who did get the kindergarten vaccines inappropriately because the parent didn’t realize the other parent had taken them for a FluMist elsewhere. They needed to repeat the MMR and varicella vaccines, which didn’t make the kids happy!

FluMist is coming back to the US for the 2018-2019 flu vaccine season. It is not the preferred vaccine by many experts due to continued concerns about its effectiveness, but it will be preferred by many kids who hate needles. If your kids worry about shots, learn how to make them less painful.

Be sure to keep track if your kids get a FluMist – especially if they’re getting kindergarten vaccines around the same time!

Learn more about vaccine preventable diseases:

This comic book can teach kids and adults about viruses and how science works:

Dr. Paul Offit is one of the leading experts on vaccines. His many books can show how vaccines work and why they’re needed. He delves into the anti-vaccine movement in many of his books. He shows how delayed vaccine schedules are not effective or necessary in most of his books. I have many of these at my office available for patient families to check out. Just ask if you’re in my office. Otherwise, read about each on the links to see what best fits your needs.


Note: As an Amazon Affiliate Member, I will get a small percentage for the sale of the books if purchased from these links. This is at no additional cost to you.

Vaccine Resources for Kids and Teens is a great list of resources from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

15 Common Anti-Vaccine Arguments and Why They are a Load of Crap

How Math (and Vaccines) Keep You Safe From the Flu Simple (or not so simple) math shows how herd immunity works. Widespread vaccination can disrupt the exponential spread of disease and prevent epidemics.

Simulation of how herd immunity works. Is a free online simulation. Try it!

The CDC schedule:

 

 

What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed?

A lot of parents question the timing of vaccines. What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed? Does the series need to be restarted? Is it even worth it if it’s late?

There are so many questions about delayed vaccines…

This is not about a delayed schedule.

Intentionally delaying vaccines, especially during the infant schedule, puts kids at risk for catching a disease.

I always recommend giving vaccines according the standard vaccine schedule. This helps protect our children and our communities.

A bit about insurance…

There also might be insurance issues if vaccines are given out of the standard age range. Details of coverage should be in the fine print of your individual contract with your insurance company and your physician will not know coverage specifics. You should talk to your insurance company to see if there are limitations on vaccine coverage if you are vaccinating outside the standard vaccine schedule.

Most insurance companies cover the infant series until 2 years of age. I recommend getting those done prior to the 2nd birthday if at all possible, not only for the protection of your child, but also potential increased costs to you if your insurance company has age restrictions.

The “kindergarten” vaccines are given between 4 and 6 years of age and then there are “tween/teen” vaccines at 11-12 and 16 years. These also might fall into age restrictions of your insurance company, so talk to an insurance company representative if you have questions on payment.

Life happens, and sometimes there are inadvertent delays in vaccinating.

The typical question I’m asked regarding what happens if a vaccine booster is delayed is along the lines of one of these questions:

“He is due for his kindergarten shots on July 5th, but we’re on vacation then. Is it okay to wait until the end of July?”

or

“Tweeny is getting her first HPV vaccine today, but she has a big out of town tournament the week she is due for the 2nd dose. Can she come later?”

The answer to both questions: yes.

Vaccines are recommended with minimal intervals. If there’s a delay for whatever reason (missed appointments, scheduling conflicts, temporary immune compromise-such as cancer) it’s usually recommended to catch up as soon as possible.

Vaccine series do not need to be restarted if the interval has been longer than recommended. You give the next required dose and make sure successive doses fit minimal intervals and age limitations.

Minimal intervals will be discussed in a future post.

Exceptions to completing the series

There are a few vaccines that should not be given if too much time has passed.

Rotavirus vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine is very specific as to when it can be given.

There are two types of rotavirus vaccine. One is typically given at 2, 4, and 6 months. The other is given at 2 and 4 months. Either is considered acceptable. It is recommended to use the same type to complete the series, but they can be interchanged if needed.

The minimum age for the first dose is 6 weeks and the maximum age for dose #1 is 14 weeks 6 days.

Vaccination should not be started for infants age 15 weeks or older due to safety concerns in older infants. If an infant of 15 weeks 1 day or older has not started the rotavirus vaccine, they should not start it.

The maximum age for the last dose of rotavirus vaccine is 8 months and 0 days. If an older infant has not completed the series, it is not recommended to do a catch up.

Hib vaccine

The Hib vaccine also has different versions and a variable schedule due to vaccine types and combination vaccines. It is either a 3 or 4 dose series. The earliest it can be given is 6 weeks, but it standardly starts at 2 months.

At least one dose is recommended after the first birthday for children under 5 years of age.

It is not recommend to give Hib vaccine after 5 years of age to healthy children. Some high risk people should continue to get the vaccine beyond their 5th birthday.

Pneumococcal vaccine

Again, there are various types of pneumoccal vaccine, but the one routinely given to infants is the PCV13.

The youngest an infant can receive this vaccine is 6 weeks, but it’s typically given at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months. If a child misses doses, they should do catch up vaccines at least 28 days apart and at least one dose after the first birthday, unless they are over 5 years of age.

Only children with underlying health risks require catch up doses if they’re over 5 years of age.

Some schools require at least one dose, so children over 5 years who have never had this vaccine may be required to be vaccinated despite the CDC guidelines. While this is safe, it may not be covered by insurance. (Another great reason to stay on the routine schedule as much as possible!)

DTaP and Tdap (D and d = diptheria, T = tetanus, P and p = pertussis/whooping cough)

The DTaP vaccine is typically given at 2, 4, 6 months and then boosters at 15-18 months and 4-6 years of age. If the full series hasn’t been given, it is okay to complete it up until the 7th birthday with the DTaP.

If the child is over age 7, the Tdap should be given instead of the Dtap. These cover the same diseases, but the Dtap has a higher diphtheria component than the Tdap (as indicated by the capital letters).

The Tdap is the booster that is usually given at 11-12 years of age, but can be used as early as 7 years if the Dtap series was not completed or if there is a wound requiring a tetanus booster.

If additional doses are needed after one Tdap, Td boosters can be used to complete the primary series.

Tetanus boosters are recommended every 10 years and with each pregnancy. The Td vaccine is recommended for most of these boosters. Exceptions are that the Tdap  should be used during pregnancy and can be used if the Td is not available.

Polio

In the US, the standard polio vaccine schedule is 4 doses at 2, 4, 6-18 months and 4-6 years.

In other countries it is given soon after birth and there are additional doses. Even if a child has had more than 4 doses, if one was not given after the 4th birthday, an additional dose is needed.

Conversely, if the 3rd dose was given after the 4th birthday and 6 months or more after the previous dose, a 4th dose is not needed.

Typhoid

The typhoid vaccine is not on the standard US vaccine schedule. It’s recommended for many travelers and it might involve at-home compliance, so I decided to include it.

The injectable typhoid vaccine is recommended for 2 years of age and up and can be repeated every 2 years. Talk to your doctor to see where it is available, since they may or may not keep it in stock.

The oral typhoid vaccine is the one that can be complicated. It can be given to children over 6 years of age through adult years. It is boosted every 5 years. Even though it is a vaccine, it is given in pill form by mouth. It should be given on an empty stomach every other day for a total of 4 doses. The pills should be kept in the refrigerator, which can make them hard to remember. Because they are a live virus vaccine, they should not be taken with antibiotics. If antibiotics are required during the week of administration, the vaccine won’t be as effective and doses might need to be repeated. If there are forgotten doses, talk to your physician to be sure the series does not need to be repeated.

So… What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed?

Talk to your pediatrician (or the people where you get your vaccines) to make a plan to catch up on immunizations.

Good news! The CDC has a catch-up schedule that gives a timeline of when to give various vaccines if you’re off the typical schedule.

What happens if a vaccine booster is delayed
Source: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf#page=3

There’s even a cool vaccine scheduler that you can use to estimate what vaccines your child needs.

Talk to your physician to help decide how to catch your family up on their vaccines.

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